A Guide To Choosing The Best BMX Bikes For Adults (2020 Reviews)

Getting a BMX bike for your adult self is about investing in a career of racing, doing stunts, or defining your own style on the street. In this sense, you need to be sure about the kind of bike you want to partner with, and that you’re buying something of real worth.

So, how will you choose among many kinds? And, how much are you willing to pay for your perfect bike?

In this article, I’ll be giving you insights on choosing from among the best BMX bikes for adults, and then show you five of the top BMX models you can get started with.

Product Comparison Table

Last update on 2020-09-25 at 02:16 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

How To Choose A BMX If You’re An Adult – Buying Essentials

Choosing a BMX bike for yourself and not for your kid implies one thing. You’re serious about this business. You’d want to have a bike that suits your size, complies with your more heavy-duty demands, matches your chosen BMX discipline, lasts you years, and of course, fits your budget.

Let’s break all these factors down and discuss how you can choose a BMX bike for yourself. And properly at that.

Picking The Proper Bike Size 

The most common factor we’re looking at when sizing BMX bikes is the rider’s height. In some cases, especially among adults, you’d probably need to count the weight.

In the table that follows, you’ll see the ideal frame size, top tube length, and handlebar width for a typical adult rider.

I’m not accounting the weight in the table, though, since it’s not linearly related to the height factor across all riders.

Suffice it to say that if you’re slightly bigger than most riders of your height, you might want to give a higher allowance for the top tube length as well as wheel size.

With the standard BMX wheels being at 20 inches of diameter, you can go for 24-inch tires to provide you with additional support. But again, only if you’re bigger.

Frame SizeTop Tube LengthHandlebar WidthRider Height
Expert18.5″ – 19.5″22.5” – 27”4’8” – 5’4”(147 – 163 cm)
Expert XL19.25” – 20” 25.5” – 27”5’2” – 5’6”(157 – 168 cm)
Pro20″ – 20.5″27” – 28”5’3” – 5’8”(160 – 172 cm)
Pro XL or XXL20.5” – 21.25”28”5’7” to 6’0”(170 – 183 cm)
Pro XXL21.25” and up28”6’0” and up(183 cm and over)

Choosing The Best Material

How you’re going to use your BMX bike determines the kinds of materials you should be looking for. Generally, BMX bike frames and other metal parts would be made of any of the following:

  • Aluminum. Aluminum is typically used for small bike parts because it doesn’t add a lot of weight to the overall structure. It’s also cheap. In some cases, though, you’d find bikes with aluminum frames — especially among BMX racing types. As you would know, racing requires a stiff and lightweight frame. Hence the choice of aluminum.
  • Hi-Ten (high-tensile) or carbon steel. If you need to have a more durable bike that still feels light, you can find one that has a Hi-Ten steel frame. Some carbon fiber frames even have the ability to dampen vibration, which makes them sturdier against heavy-duty BMX bike uses.
  • Chromoly. Chromoly 4130 (chromo or Cr-Mo) is a steel alloy that offers even more strength than high tensile steel. This material allows butting, which simply means that a Chromoly tubing can be made thinner and lighter in a certain part (say, in the middle) but thicker or more reinforced at the ends.

While Chromoly is indeed the superior type among these common bike materials, note that it’s also the most expensive.

Choosing The Right Tyres 

The standard BMX tire diameter is 20 inches, as I’ve already mentioned. This may be much smaller than the wheels of both road bikes and mountain bikes, but it’s a sufficient size for BMX riding for most people.

So again, if you’re taller or bigger, you can opt for 24-inch tires. These could offer you more stability, as well.

Now, BMX tires actually vary beyond just the size. The more important criterion you should look at is how you’re going to use your BMX bike. Yes, BMX tires can be classified according to the specific purpose or BMX discipline they serve.

We can categorize them into three groups.

BMX

“True” BMX tires are used for what BMX stands for — Bicycle Motocross. So, tires of this type would have to let you cruise through a race and at the same time, handle dirt and pressure well.

For that matter, some premium BMX tires can accept high loads of pressure such as 110 PSI (pounds per square inch). They should be able to roll as fast as possible and handle a number of hard landings.

In some types of BMX racing where you’d have you go through dirt tracks, you would need a pair of BMX tires that have deep and thick treads to offer you more traction.

Freestyle

Freestyle BMX tires are not about speed. After all, freestyle riding began when some BMX racers just got bored when they were not doing races. Hence the crazy tricks.

So, freestyle tires are about how they should be able to handle multiple stunts while offering you more balance.

Ideally, these tires should be around 2.2 inches wide so they can survive high-impact landings.

They should also provide you with enough grip on the ground — whether you’re at the skatepark or on the street — as these would typically have slippery surfaces.

If you’re performing stunts over ramps, then look for freestyle BMX tires with a PSI of at least 70. This would allow you to land more softly.

Jump

Dirt jumping would require you to have tires that are thinner than those in freestyle bikes. And yes, since they’re thinner, they should weigh much less too, allowing you to jump off as high as you can.

So, most dirt BMX tires would be at 1.9 to 2 inches in width. Plus, since you’re jumping over “mountains” of dirt, your tires would need to have deep treads and feel ridgy to gain more hold.

Finally, you’d do well to have dirt jumping tires of around 40 to 65 PSI, as these would provide you with softer landings.

Budget

BMX bikes are offered in quite a wide range of prices. Of course, not all BMX bikes are created equal. So, you should set some reasonable expectations about the kind of bike you can get if you’ve already limited yourself to a certain budget.

  • $100 – $300

Most kids’ bikes, as well as entry-level adult bikes, will fall under this range of budget. Well, you can already have a bike with a Hi-Ten (high-tensile) frame around these prices.

Of course, you’d typically be offered only 1-piece cranks and unsealed bearings. As for the rims, well, they’d most likely be single-walled.

Still, some intermediate-level bikes are introduced on the higher end of this budget category (I mean they cost almost $300). There should be a few compromises though, such as having plastic pedals.

  • $300 – $500

With this price range, you should be able to find BMX bikes with Chromoly parts. A few brands would even offer you double-walled rims, while others could already give you 3-piece cranks.

Meanwhile, the bearings might already be sealed, but probably just in the rear hub.

So, this range of budget could suit you if you’re already an intermediate rider.

  • $500 – $800

Chromoly frames would now be common at this price range. Three-piece cranks should be pretty much the standard, while accessories like pegs and full seat adjustments should be made available.

Nearing the $800-mark, you should be able to find bikes with Gyro brakes — those that enable you to do 360° spins without getting the brake cables tangled.

Also, bearings should already be sealed and the chainrings should be lighter than those in entry-level bikes.

  • $800 and above

With this kind of budget, you would find BMX bikes that feature the lightest and even the strongest builds, and usually, they’re full-on Chromoly. Almost everything (if not all parts) would be lighter.

Plus, protection would be tough on the hubs, bearings, bottom bracket, and headset.

Well, if you have this budget and you’re willing to invest in a premium BMX bike, you can have it custom-built with all the best parts possible.

The Top BMX Bikes For Adults Reviewed

So, here are five of the best adult BMX bikes that you can find in the market right now.

1. Mongoose Legion Street Freestyle (Legion L10)

Key Features

  • Frame: Hi-Ten steel; top tube length: 20 inches
  • Handlebar and fork: Hi-Ten steel, joined by a 48mm stem plus threadless sealed integrated headset
  • Wheels: 20” x 2.25” tires; aluminum single-wall 36H rims; 3/8″ female axle front hub; 9T cog sealed bearing; cassette rear hub
  • Drivetrain: 170mm 1-piece forged steel crank; 25T chainring
  • Brakes: Removable brake mounts; steel U-brake; aluminum+resin brake levers
  • Suggested rider height: 4’4” to 5’0”

The Legion L10 is at the lowest end of the Mongoose Legion Freestyle BMX Bike Series. So, obviously, it’s not the most advanced. But it has some decent parts that should be enough for beginners.

For instance, its frame, handlebar, and fork are all made of high tensile steel, which should give the bike a lightweight feel without compromising on robustness. Its top tube length isn’t the biggest out there at 20”—but it’s the minimum for adult bikes, anyway.

With wheels at 20” x 2.25”, the Legion L10 has met pretty much the standard BMX requirements. With its tire width, this bike could handle your freestyle tricks.

While Mongoose suggests a rider height of 4’4” to 5’0” for the L10, slightly taller riders (as long as not nearing 6’0”) might still find this bike to be a perfect fit.

Pros

  • Easy to put together (except for the brakes)
  • Great value for the price
  • Good overall quality
  • Fairly lightweight
  • Rides smoothly

Cons

  • Pegs may turn out to be too big with no thread
  • Brakes may be a little difficult to assemble especially for beginners
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07G13T98L?creativeASIN=B07G13T98L&linkCode=w61&imprToken=ymoCsmwKbPu9hLkUpbbYQw&slotNum=0&tag=bam.bmx.bikes-20

amazon box=”B07G13T98L” /]

2. Elite 20” The Stealth Freestyle Bike

Key Features

  • Frame: Hi-Tensile steel; top tube length: 20”
  • Handlebar: 8.75”; fork: Cr-Mo (Chromoly); top load stem: 50mm alloy
  • Brake: Rear Cease U-brake; brake lever: alloy
  • Drivetrain: 170-mm Cr-Mo 1-piece crank; 25T gearing
  • Wheels: 20” x 2.5” tires; sealed bearing 14mm rear hub and low-profile 06061 rims
  • Pegs: Front and rear
  • Padded adjustable saddle

The Stealth BMX Series by Elite Bicycles feature entry-level BMX bikes. This 20” variant on our list appears to be a versatile option since it already incorporates Chromoly-made parts (the fork and crank) into a high-tensile steel frame.

So, this Stealth BMX would be lighter compared to its all-steel counterparts.

Aside from that, it has tires of 2.5 inches in width. That’s already wide enough for freestyle and street riding tricks. With micro-knurled surfaces, directional tread, and angular raised tread areas, these tires can also handle dirt jumps and cruises.

For increased comfort, Elite has also equipped its stealth bike with an adjustable saddle with padding. It makes use of an alloy post, further reducing the bike’s overall weight. Plus, it even includes a seat clamp.

Finally, the Stealth Freestyle Bike features reinforced welds on all points where impact concentrates the most.

Pros

  • Easy to put together
  • Rides well and runs smoothly
  • Value for money
  • Well-made
  • Lightweight

Cons

  • The chain may come off easily when not properly installed
  • The tires may not be that durable

Last update on 2020-09-25 at 02:16 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

3. Redline Bikes Asset 20 Freestyle BMX, Red

Key Features

  • Frame: Hi-Ten steel with Chromoly downtube
  • Wheels: 20” x 2.25” tires
  • Brakes: Rear U-brake
  • Integrated head tube; sealed mid-bottom bracket; 100% Chromoly steel 3-piece 175mm tubular cranks
  • Ultra-low profile pedals with sealed bearings; aluminum fully-sealed rear hub with Chromoly 14mm axle
  • Padded saddle

The Redline Asset 20 has a build that could be trusted with heavy-duty use, whether you’re on it at the skate park, on the streets, or you’re conquering trails. Thanks to its almost all-Chromoly design.

Its large handlebars can make your lift-offs easier, while its padded saddle allows you to rest comfortably in between jumps.

Since this bike is equipped with 3-piece tubular cranks made of 100% Chromoly, it can spin better and won’t get loose as often. So, this bike’s drivetrain could really be sturdy.

Overall, the Redline Asset 20 is designed for freestylers who would like to take their bikes to a beating. If that’s you, you’d be glad to know that this bike does hold up.

Pros

  • Very strong bike
  • Value for money
  • Simple assembly required
  • Lightweight
  • Excellent for freestyle riders
  • Can handle pro jumps
  • Rides softly
  • Wheels are non-slip on ramps

Cons

  • The chain may break off if abused
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B079P95FPM?creativeASIN=B079P95FPM&linkCode=w61&imprToken=ymoCsmwKbPu9hLkUpbbYQw&slotNum=6&tag=bam.bmx.bikes-20

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4. Framed Impact 20

Key Features

  • Frame and fork: Hi-Ten steel; top tube length: 20.25”
  • Handlebars: 8” rise
  • Wheels: 20”
  • Brake: Framed alloy rear U-brake
  • Drivetrain: 1-piece 175mm crank; 3/8″ front and rear axle; American loose ball unsealed bottom bracket
  • Suggested rider height: 4.5’ to 5.7’

The Framed Impact 20 BMX bike is an affordable ride for starting and slightly taller riders. Mostly made of high-tensile steel, and with a slightly longer top tube length, this bike might feel a little heavier than the previous ones we’ve discussed.

It’s suitable for riders up to 120 lbs, and with a height of 4.5’ to 5.7’. It doesn’t come with pegs but you can always purchase a set separately.

Anyway, this bike is easy to put together. You just have to add the front tire, handlebar, seat, and pedals into the assembly.

It’s also the kind of entry-level bike that could work on a flat dirt track for beginners. Just note though that it’s more intended for park riding.

Just a heads up. The Impact 20’s seat is a little further up and it points up, and the seat, apparently, can’t be adjusted in terms of angling. So, you might it a little difficult to reach the handlebars if you’re a smaller rider.

Pros

  • Easy to assemble
  • Reasonable pricing
  • Good-looking and solid bike
  • Rides pretty good
  • Can handle 

Cons

  • The head clamp for the handlebars may not be that tight
  • Bike seat can’t be adjusted from a certain angle
  • The brakes may not be that good
  • The sprocket may get easily bent with poor handling

Last update on 2020-09-25 at 02:16 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

5. Framed Attack Pro Slick BMX Bike

Key Features

  • Frame and fork: Chromoly; top tube length: 20.5”
  • Handlebar: Chromoly
  • Wheels: 20” x 2.35”; 9T cog, alloy 36H unsealed 3/8″ axle; double-walled rims
  • Brake: Rear U-brake
  • Drivetrain: 3-piece 175mm Hi-Ten steel crank

This bike is Framed Impact 20’s bigger brother. Literally, the Framed Attack Pro is slightly “bigger.” It has a slightly longer top tube, and it has a 175mm 3-piece Hi-Ten steel crank instead of 1-piece.

Quite surprisingly, it can even fit a 6-feet tall rider.

Meanwhile, its frame, fork, and handlebar are made of Chromoly. So, this bike should feel lighter but more durable at the same time.

Moreover, the Framed Attack Pro can already handle some progressive park BMX riding, so it’s suitable for intermediate-level riders.

Overall, this bike could compete against Redline’s Asset 20 (third item on this list), but its problem comes in its unsealed bearings — something that the Redline bike has.

Pros

  • Easy to assemble by yourself
  • Looks gorgeous
  • Feels sturdy
  • Provides smooth rides
  • Lightweight
  • Fair price point for a Chromoly-framed bike

Cons

  • The pedals can break easily if overused
  • The bearings are unsealed so they’re not protected
  • The tires aren’t of the highest quality
  • Warranty is only granted if you’ll have the bike professionally assembled

Last update on 2020-09-25 at 02:16 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

How To Pick The Right Bike For You

Picking the right bike for yourself depends on a lot of factors. But, in most cases, it does boil down to personal preference.

In this article, I’ve shown you how important it is to choose the right bike type with the best material, the most suitable size, and the one that goes along with your budget.

As for me, my preference goes to the Redline Asset 20, among all the others on my list of top adult BMX bikes.

Budget-wise, it already offers great value, considering its wise use of both Chromoly and Hi-Ten steel in its main parts. Its sealed bearings, mid-bottom bracket, and rear hub — along with its 3-piece cranks — all contribute to the Asset 20’s overall durability. Finally, it’s just the right standard size for me.

Now, how about you? Haven’t you taken your pick yet?

Last update on 2020-09-25 at 02:16 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Perry
Perry
Hello, my names Perry and I've been a freelance writer for the past 5 years and a cycling enthusiastic since I can remember. I love the road, but my main passion is mountain biking.